HR and Operations

Working from home has grown more popular than ever due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Although it can make the workday more flexible and safe, it poses challenges for employees and employers alike. In particular, challenges regarding social well-being and connectivity are among some of the top concerns with working remotely.

Although it’s tough, there are some ways to stay connected while working from home.

What Is Social Well-being?

HR Insights Blog HeaderThe Time We’re Living In Now Is Not Like Any Other Period From Recent Memory. Between The COVID-19 Pandemic, Global Economic Downturns And Lingering Job Shortages, It’s Safe To Say That We’re All Charting Unknown Waters.

It can seem like entire processes and workflows have gone out the window— sacrificed for the sake of staying afloat. And performance reviews are among the greatest casualties.

The COVID-19 pandemic has undoubtedly changed many aspects of the modern workplace—and some of those changes may continue in perpetuity after the pandemic is over. One aspect that falls into this category is paid leave programs.

Many employers across the country are changing paid leave programs to comply with applicable federal, state or local guidelines during the pandemic and support employees through these challenging times. In fact, according to data from Mercer, 49% of surveyed employers have adjusted their sick leave programs due to COVID-19-related absences and about 12% have expanded employees’ time off to show their appreciation.

Legal Update HeaderOn Oct. 13, 2020, the Small Business Administration (SBA) published a new set of answers to frequently asked questions about the forgiveness of loans issued under the federal Paycheck Protection Program (PPP).

The PPP was created by the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (CARES Act) as a response to the current COVID-19 pandemic and was designed to provide a direct incentive for employers to keep their workers on the payroll. Small businesses and eligible nonprofit organizations, Veterans organizations, and Tribal businesses described in the Small Business Act, as well as individuals who are self-employed or are independent contractors, are eligible if they also meet program size standards.

The need for social distancing has put a pause on normal socializing activities, like family get-togethers, restaurant outings and music concerts.

As the pandemic continues, social distancing doesn’t need to mean social isolation. If you don’t address it, isolation and loneliness during the pandemic may pose a risk to your mental health.

Why It Matters

Social connectivity is the feeling of closeness and connectedness to a community. Every connection has a lasting impact on our physical and mental health—so it’s especially important during this time to focus on connectivity to support both yourself and others in your community.

If your organization has had an employee contract the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) and you need to inform your customers or vendors as well as having possible contact with this individual, Reseco Group is pleased to provide a free editable word document template for your use. Word Document iconNote, some customization is required. To download a copy of the template please complete this form and it will take you to the download page.    

HR Compliance Bulletin headerIn response to the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, states have passed new laws and issued new regulations and guidance about employee leave taken for COVID-19 reasons.

These provisions are in addition to the federal Emergency Paid Sick Leave and Emergency Family and Medical Leave Expansion requirements passed on March 18 as part of the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA).

HR Insights Blog HeaderEach year, the seasonal flu has a marked impact on businesses and employers, causing increased absenteeism, decreased productivity and higher health care costs. The past few flu seasons have seen high hospitalization and mortality rates, which has public health experts fearing another deadly flu season.

Unfortunately, the 2020-21 flu season isn’t the only health crisis employers and employees have to address this year. The COVID-19 pandemic is still affecting the workforce, and the combination of another potentially bad flu season and the pandemic has public health experts worried. As an employer, you are well-positioned to help keep your employees healthy and minimize the impact that influenza has on your business. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends strategies to help employers fight the flu and talk to employees about what a flu season during the pandemic looks like.

HR Insights Blog HeaderTerminations aren’t easy, and the current pandemic is causing new challenges for the process. Conducting terminations in-person may be the standard procedure for many organizations, but with more employees working remotely than ever before, an in-person termination isn’t always feasible—or might be logistically impractical.

When conducting remote terminations, having an effective process in place can ease this difficult task and reduce risk for an employer. This article offers considerations for conducting a remote termination. Employers should ensure that those involved with terminations are aware of all applicable laws. The considerations outlined in this article are not legal advice. Laws and guidelines related to terminations may vary by locality. Employers should consult with local legal counsel for any termination-related issues.