HR and Operations

HR Insights Blog HeaderIn response to the COVID-19 pandemic, day cares and schools shut their doors. Months later, child care centers remain closed in many parts of the country, which means that parents are tasked with juggling caregiving and work responsibilities.

In fact, according to a survey from Boston Consulting Group (BCG), 60% of U.S. parents report that they’ve had no outside help with child care during the pandemic.

AHR Insights Blog Headers businesses across the country continue reopening and the threat of a second wave of COVID-19 cases looms, employers are facing difficult decisions regarding work-from-home arrangements.

Some employers are opting to extend work-from-home arrangements until next year, others are asking all employees to return to the office and some are offering a hybrid of the two models. For employers that are either reopening in phases or allowing some employees to continue to work from home during the pandemic, the question of who should continue working from home becomes a pressing issue. This article will provide an overview of best practices for employers to consider when determining which employees should continue to work from home during the pandemic.

HR Insights Blog HeaderThe stigma around working from home has mostly been lifted as the COVID-19 (coronavirus) pandemic abruptly shifted many employees into a remote work setting. Many organizations are expecting and planning more remote work for the foreseeable future.

Before the pandemic, common office perks included remote work opportunities and work schedule flexibility. Now, employees are starting to expect that from their current and future employers. Work perks related to food, wellness and technology are being introduced as employers rethink and adjust company culture. Perks should be more inclusive and easily used by any employee regardless of their work location.

HR Insights Blog HeaderAs we look into what the workplace will look like post-coronavirus, the reality for many employers may involve supporting a geographically distant workforce.

Some employees may be returning to an on-site work location, while others will be working remotely longer-term, or even permanently. Teams comprised of both remote and on-site employees may not only be the current reality—but the new normal. The expansion of remote work affects each organization uniquely, and employers can consider what actions may help bridge the gap between all employees.

HR Insights Blog HeaderIn response to the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, states have passed new laws and issued new regulations and guidance about employee leave taken for COVID-19 reasons.

These provisions are in addition to the federal Emergency Paid Sick Leave and Emergency Family and Medical Leave Expansion requirements passed on March 18 as part of the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA).

Legal Update HeaderOn July 20, 2020, the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) announced the agency’s publication of additional guidance on applying federal employment laws in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic.

The guidance is in the form of questions and answers added to sets of Q&As the agency issued earlier in the year about the operation of the federal Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA), the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) and the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA) in workplace situations involving COVID-19.

Legal Update HeaderThe U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) is seeking information from the public about the effectiveness of paid employee family and medical leave.

In a Request for Information (RFI) issued July 15, 2020, the DOL said it intends to gather information about the effectiveness of current state-and employer-provided paid leave programs, and how access or lack of access to these programs impacts workers and their families. The RFI explains that “paid leave programs” for its purposes refers to paid family and medical leave to care for a family member’s, or for one’s own, health.

HR Insights Blog HeaderThe coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic has upended the entire world, it seems. With fluctuating infection rates and conflicting official guidance, organizations will need to adapt quickly if they want to succeed in the post-coronavirus landscape.

HR teams stand at the forefront of these efforts. For years, HR departments have been tasked with ushering in fundamental workplace changes, and this moment is no different. This article includes five ways the coronavirus is reshaping HR and how departments can adapt to these new challenges.

HR Insights Blog HeaderWhen seeking an employer, many applicants hope to find an organization with values that align with their own. As employers create post-coronavirus plans, corporate social responsibility (CSR) is as essential as ever.

Job seekers are keeping an eye on how organizations are treating their employees and their communities—and likely, your organization has taken steps to adapt and provide support during this challenging time. Organizations can boost their brand by not only engaging in activities that benefit society but ensuring that these accomplishments are included in their employer brand and recruiting efforts.