COVID-19

This article compiles important information from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Visit www.cdc.gov/covid-19 for more information.

This article contains important information from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) regarding quarantining after a COVID-19 exposure.

What Is a Quarantine?

A quarantine is used to keep someone who might have been exposed to COVID-19 away from others. It helps prevent spread of disease that can occur before a person knows they are sick or if they are infected with a virus without feeling symptoms. People in quarantine should stay home, separate themselves from others, monitor their health and follow directions from their state or local health department.

AHR Insights Blog Headers businesses across the country continue reopening and the threat of a second wave of COVID-19 cases looms, employers are facing difficult decisions regarding work-from-home arrangements.

Some employers are opting to extend work-from-home arrangements until next year, others are asking all employees to return to the office and some are offering a hybrid of the two models. For employers that are either reopening in phases or allowing some employees to continue to work from home during the pandemic, the question of who should continue working from home becomes a pressing issue. This article will provide an overview of best practices for employers to consider when determining which employees should continue to work from home during the pandemic.

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As a result of the unprecedented challenges the COVID-19 pandemic brings, businesses must review their internal protocols to ensure they are doing all they can to protect their workforce and manage their operations.

This is particularly true as it relates to housekeeping and sanitation best practices, especially given how precise these procedures need to be, based on guidelines from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and other health officials. This document provides an overview of cleaning recommendations from the CDC and includes a sample log that businesses can use during their cleaning and sanitization procedures.

HR Insights Blog HeaderThe stigma around working from home has mostly been lifted as the COVID-19 (coronavirus) pandemic abruptly shifted many employees into a remote work setting. Many organizations are expecting and planning more remote work for the foreseeable future.

Before the pandemic, common office perks included remote work opportunities and work schedule flexibility. Now, employees are starting to expect that from their current and future employers. Work perks related to food, wellness and technology are being introduced as employers rethink and adjust company culture. Perks should be more inclusive and easily used by any employee regardless of their work location.

HR Insights Blog HeaderAs we look into what the workplace will look like post-coronavirus, the reality for many employers may involve supporting a geographically distant workforce.

Some employees may be returning to an on-site work location, while others will be working remotely longer-term, or even permanently. Teams comprised of both remote and on-site employees may not only be the current reality—but the new normal. The expansion of remote work affects each organization uniquely, and employers can consider what actions may help bridge the gap between all employees.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends the use of masks and face coverings in public, and CDC Director Robert Redfield expanded on the topic during a discussion hosted by medical journal JAMA.

Redfield stated, "If we could get everybody to wear a mask right now, I think in four, six, eight weeks we could bring this epidemic under control." During the discussion, Redfield noted that “we are not defenseless against COVID-19,” stating that “cloth face coverings are one of the most powerful weapons we have to slow and stop the spread of the virus— particularly when used universally within a community setting. All Americans have a responsibility to protect themselves, their families and their communities.’’

HR Insights Blog HeaderIn response to the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, states have passed new laws and issued new regulations and guidance about employee leave taken for COVID-19 reasons.

These provisions are in addition to the federal Emergency Paid Sick Leave and Emergency Family and Medical Leave Expansion requirements passed on March 18 as part of the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA).

Legal Update HeaderOn July 20, 2020, the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) announced the agency’s publication of additional guidance on applying federal employment laws in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic.

The guidance is in the form of questions and answers added to sets of Q&As the agency issued earlier in the year about the operation of the federal Family and Medical Leave Act (FMLA), the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) and the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA) in workplace situations involving COVID-19.